MAO-deficient mice



MAO A-deficient mice

In this video Dr. Shih describe MAO A deficiency and explains why MAO A-deficient mice fight and other behaviors that can be studied.

 

MAO B-deficient mice

When MAO B is absent, there will be a build up of phenylethylamine in the brain.  There also will be increased reactivity to stress but little or no aggression in these mice.  These mice are resistant to Parkinsonian inducing toxins (MPTP).

 

What happens to mice when they are both MAO A & B Deficient?


A Spontaneous Point Mutation Produces Monoamine Oxidase A/B Knock-out Mice with Greatly Elevated Monoamines andAnxiety-like Behavior, July 12, 2004

Link to article: 2004 A Spontaneous Point Mutation

 

MAO A-deficient mice and aggression

In this video Dr. Shih describes the relationship between brain chemistry and aggressive behavior. Also she discusses:

• The animal model and the biochemical foundations of aggressive behavior

• The next step

• Social factors and aggression

• Where these studies can lead

 

Two ways of treating aggressive behavior in mice

In this video, Dr. Chen describes two ways of treating aggressive behavior in mice: genetics and drugs.


FOREBRAIN SPECIFIC EXPRESSION OF MONOAMINE OXIDASE A REDUCES NEUROTRANSMITTER LEVELS, RESTORES THE BRAIN STRUCTURE AND RESCUES AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR IN MONOAMINE OXIDASE A DEFICIENT MICE, November 7, 2006

Link to article: 2007 Forebrain-specific expression

 

MAO A knockout mice before and after drug treatment

A comparison of MAO A knockout mice: the top frame shows aggressive mice and the bottom frame shows behavior modified with the drug tetrabenazine.